Improve Your Business Email Writing Skills: How to Build Rapport through Email

January 10, 2011

In a face-to-face scenario, it’s easier to build personal rapport because a real person can be seen and heard. It’s also easier to communicate over the telephone because you can hear the tone of the voice used without having to see the person at the other end of the conversation.

But on email, you don’t have either of these advantages, so it’s important to learn writing techniques that can help you create rapport with your readers, customers and colleagues.

Here are some email writing techniques you can use.

Engage your reader by using positive affirmations

In general, everyone loves reading messages that bring a smile to their faces. With this rule in mind, always be warm and friendly in your opening. Use positive affirmations where appropriate.

Here are some examples:

  • Thank you for taking the time to meet up with us earlier this afternoon. It gave us a good opportunity to learn more about the new project.
  • Thanks for calling me today. It was nice of you to clarify this issue with me personally.
  • I’m so happy to hear this good news from you! You’ve worked really hard the past few months and I think you deserved to win the “Best Staff of the Month” award. Congratulations!

Be personal, write with emotion and empathy

Emotive and sensory words add texture and dimension to every message that you write. But most people (office managers especially) are so keen to get straight to the point that they often sound rude, authoritative and even offensive.

Remember that people typically respond better to positive language and messages that sound personal. For example:

  • Let me know what are some of the questions you have. I’ll help you sort out this problem.
  • I appreciate your understanding in trying to resolve this issue.
  • I hope I can help you solve this problem very soon.
  • I understand your concern. I’m always here to help. Please call me.
  • What are some of your concerns? I’ll be most happy to help you out.
All these topics and more are also covered in the QuickStart Copywriter ebook.

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Email Writing Techniques: Use the Appropriate Tone of Voice for Better Results!

May 6, 2010

A big part in writing better emails is to convey your message using an appropriate tone. This is especially important when you write emails to business clients where the tone of your message can make or break a deal. The tone reflects the spirit in which you relay your message – do you sound courteous, respectful or friendly?

Even when you write a complaint email or send a reply to someone, your message should be written in a way that doesn’t sound rude or offensive. Messages that sound rude, tactless or offensive will not help you achieve your desired purpose. Just imagine an angry mother yelling at a child to clean up his room. An enlightened parent would know that frustration would only breed rebellion. This is the same with writing – it is important to choose the right words wisely if you want to persuade your readers to do exactly what you want.

Here are some expressions that use the wrong tone of voice and should be avoided in your email correspondences:

Instead of saying:

“Due to your failure in informing us about your late payment, we shall penalize you as per the agreement”

Say:

“We received a late payment from you, so unfortunately you must bear the cost of the agreed penalty amount”

Instead of saying:

“I want to complain about your poor service at one of your stores!”

Say:

“I was displeased/unhappy with the level of service I received at one of your stores.”

Instead of saying:

“You should have read our terms and conditions before you bought our goods. We are not liable for the problem that occurred!”

Say:

“Our terms and conditions state that all goods sold are not refundable and we are sorry that we are unable to help you.”


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