Improve Your Business Email Writing Skills: How to Build Rapport through Email

January 10, 2011

In a face-to-face scenario, it’s easier to build personal rapport because a real person can be seen and heard. It’s also easier to communicate over the telephone because you can hear the tone of the voice used without having to see the person at the other end of the conversation.

But on email, you don’t have either of these advantages, so it’s important to learn writing techniques that can help you create rapport with your readers, customers and colleagues.

Here are some email writing techniques you can use.

Engage your reader by using positive affirmations

In general, everyone loves reading messages that bring a smile to their faces. With this rule in mind, always be warm and friendly in your opening. Use positive affirmations where appropriate.

Here are some examples:

  • Thank you for taking the time to meet up with us earlier this afternoon. It gave us a good opportunity to learn more about the new project.
  • Thanks for calling me today. It was nice of you to clarify this issue with me personally.
  • I’m so happy to hear this good news from you! You’ve worked really hard the past few months and I think you deserved to win the “Best Staff of the Month” award. Congratulations!

Be personal, write with emotion and empathy

Emotive and sensory words add texture and dimension to every message that you write. But most people (office managers especially) are so keen to get straight to the point that they often sound rude, authoritative and even offensive.

Remember that people typically respond better to positive language and messages that sound personal. For example:

  • Let me know what are some of the questions you have. I’ll help you sort out this problem.
  • I appreciate your understanding in trying to resolve this issue.
  • I hope I can help you solve this problem very soon.
  • I understand your concern. I’m always here to help. Please call me.
  • What are some of your concerns? I’ll be most happy to help you out.
All these topics and more are also covered in the QuickStart Copywriter ebook.

Supercharge your sales writing skills in 7 days! Click here to get started!

Find this blog post helpful? Buy me coffee or send me a tip!

Like This!

Add to FacebookAdd to DiggAdd to Del.icio.usAdd to StumbleuponAdd to RedditAdd to BlinklistAdd to TwitterAdd to TechnoratiAdd to Yahoo BuzzAdd to Newsvine

Advertisements


How to Write Better Emails: Avoid Unnecessary, Old-Fashioned Phrases!

March 4, 2010

Business language has changed. But unfortunately, not many people realize that!

Take a look at this email I received a few days ago:

Dear Sir,

Enclosed herewith is the letter as per your request.

Please revert back to us if you may need any further information to support the membership application.  We will do our best to assist.

Cheers

If the tone of the email sounds familiar, that’s because everyone else is using it! Open up your inbox and I guarantee you’ll find emails that are riddled with stuffy, centuries-old expressions like “I am pleased”, “As per your request” and “Enclosed herewith”, among others. Unnecessary, long-winded phrases such as those dilute the meaning behind your messages and lead to confusion.

So if I were to re-write the above email in the style and tone of today’s writing, I’d say:

Hi Marc!

Here’s the letter you requested.

If you need more information to support the membership application, please me know.

I’ll do my best to help.

Cheers

See the difference?

On print, the word count of the email is now shorter and the messages are easier to read. When read out loud, the tone of the email sounds more natural and relaxed. So if you want to capture the interest of your readers – some of whom I believe could be important business clients – you have to keep your emails concise, focused and personal. It also leaves a better impression on your readers!


Supercharge your sales writing skills in 7 days! Click here to get started!

Find this blog post helpful? Buy me coffee or send me a tip!

Add to FacebookAdd to DiggAdd to Del.icio.usAdd to StumbleuponAdd to RedditAdd to BlinklistAdd to TwitterAdd to TechnoratiAdd to Yahoo BuzzAdd to Newsvine